WE GIVE THANKS TO OUR VETERANS

“Honor to the soldier and sailor everywhere, who bravely bears his country’s cause. Honor, also, to the citizen who cares for his brother in the field and serves, as he best can, the same cause.” – Abraham Lincoln

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We are proud of those sons and daughters that we know by name and those we know by heart.They are all our children. There are no words to explain the depth of gratitude we owe these brave men and women and their families.

I am proud to say that my son, Sgt. Joe Reinart is a veteran. My Dad, Joseph Christopher Vayo was a veteran. Thank you to all who have served and for your many sacrifices. We are so proud of your commitment to us. We love you more than you know.

Joseph Vayo 18 yrs old 1942 grandfather of Joseph Reinart:Joseph Reinart 21 yrs old 2002: Edmund Reinart,  32 yrs. old 1942 grandfather Joseph Reinart

Part I Hearing Voices: 6 Steps I Used For Creating An Anthology

This is how I created my anthology. It is a labor of love dedicated to the two veterans in my life, my father and my son.

Love You More Than You Know: Mothers’ Stories About Sending Their Sons and Daughters to War lets the voice of mothers be heard.  God bless our troops and our military families.

Joseph Vayo 18 yrs old 1942 grandfather of Joseph Reinart:Joseph Reinart 21 yrs old 2002: Edmund Reinart,  32 yrs. old 1942 grandfather Joseph Reinart

A Tradition Based on Love

Over the river, and through the wood,
To Grandmother’s house we go;
the horse knows the way to carry the sleigh
through the white and drifted snow. Over the river, and through the wood,
to Grandfather’s house away!
We would not stop for doll or top,
for ’tis Thanksgiving Day.
~Lydia Maria Child

There is nothing more I love than getting together with my children and grandchildren. We have a tradition at holidays. As we welcome family from near and far,  we set an extra plate at our table to remind us of our troops unable to be home with their families and friends during the holidays.

Amidst the baking of pumpkin muffins, the mashing of potatoes, and the basting of the turkey, remember not only to count your blessings, but remember those that are serving and protecting us.Thank God for these brave men and women and all the freedoms we have. May God bless our servicemen and woman, our veterans, and our families and friends.  Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Help This Marine Help Other Vets

tieToday, I received the beautiful tie I ordered for my son, Joe. The link to the story is here. Help this Marine, Antonio Centino.  Antonio says, ” I’m going to give Stop Soldier Suicide ( a non-profit vet run organization) $20,000 this Veteran’s day to raise awareness of military suicide. To do this – I created 400 neckties to honor each of the 4 military branches. For every tie sold I’m donating $50 to the cause.”

“You can check out my project here: The ties are really nice (100% silk, regimental stripe, using historic service colors). I figure give Marines/Airmen/Sailors/Soldiers a tie they’re proud to wear all the while helping those vets that need it. Win- Win!”

The ties are retailing for $79 each – however any veteran/active duty/military spouse can use the code “military” for a $30 discount. “All proceeds, all profits–we are not making any money on this– go to Stop Soldier Suicides.” Meet Antonio in this video explaining his cause.
Antonio, this is a great gift all the way around. Thank you for sponsoring this project!
Order a tie for your favorite serviceman today!

Help a Marine Stop Soldier Suicides

veterans_day_military_tiesGive a warm welcome to my guest, Antonio Centino. He is a former U.S. Marine, Texan, father, husband, and founder of the veteran resource High Speed Low Drag.

“Back in 2003″, Antonio remebers,”my friend, Second Lieutenant Christopher Shay killed himself while we were deployed.”

Bill Briggs, NBC News contributor, in his article One Every 18 hours: Military Suicide Rate Still High, tells us, “Research published last week has experts concerned that American troops who survived multiple nearby IED blasts while in Afghanistan and Iraq now are at greater jeopardy for harming themselves. People who have suffered numerous mild traumatic brain injuries — or concussions — carry a higher suicide risk, according to the first study to make that connection.”

Antonio says, ” I’m going to give Stop Soldier Suicide ( a non-profit vet run organization) $20,000 this Veteran’s day to raise awareness of military suicide. To do this – I created 400 neckties to honor each of the 4 military branches. For every tie sold I’m donating $50 to the cause.”

Antonio and his friend, Hendrik Pohl, who runs Bows n’ Ties, partnered together on this project. Antonio explains, “All proceeds, all profits–we are not making any money on this– go to Stop Soldier Suicides.”

“You can check out my project here: The ties are really nice (100% silk, regimental stripe, using historic service colors). I figure give Marines/Airmen/Sailors/Soldiers a tie they’re proud to wear all the while helping those vets that need it. Win- Win!”

The ties are retailing for $79 each – however any veteran/active duty/military spouse can use the code “military” for a $30 discount.  Meet Antonio in this video explaining his cause.
Thank you, Antonio for your service and continued good works. You help make the world a better place. I bought my son a tie and can hardly wait to give it to him.

Rocking Support for our Troops

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The other day, I received a note from Jimmy Anderson. He said my son’s band, Athens, just released a video to go with their song, “Time to Rise”.

In real life, the man in the video, an army veteran is having a hard time dealing with his time fighting in war. The woman in the video is also an army veteran. Her husband was killed in action. Her husband is the blonde man pictured on the boot during the bridge scene in the video. He also left behind a young son.

Like a lot of veterans coming back home into the real world, these veterans are having a hard time adjusting. The video was therapy for these two amazing people. Athens was happy to be able to give something back to these brave soldiers.

The band has been together since 2008. Chase wrote the lyrics to “Time to Rise”. Members of the band include: Chase Brown (17 yrs.) plays rhythm guitar/ keys / sings vocals. Beau “Monkey” Anderson (15 yrs.) plays lead guitar. Zak “Blonde Blur” Smith (18 yrs.) plays drums and does vocals. Justin Granados (18 yrs,) plays bass and does vocals. Jimmy and the band want to thank all veterans for their service. They hope the song and video help and inspire our veterans.

Thank you to Jimmy and Athens for supporting our troops. You rock!

God bless the two army veterans in this video. Please pray for their peace and healing. If you have lost a loved one ,TAPS (Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors) welcomes anyone who is grieving the death of someone who died while serving in the military – regardless of where they died or how they died. If you are hurting, we are here for you. We are so sorry for the loss of your loved one.

Find out more about Athens at these links.

Facebook

Website

Start This Holiday Traditon

Amidst the baking of pumpkin muffins, the mashing of potatoes, and the basting of the turkey, remember not only to count your blessings but also to remember those who are serving and protecting us.

As we welcome family from near and far, start a new tradition for Thanksgiving. Set an extra plate at your table as a reminder of our troops unable to be home with their families and friends during the holidays.

Thank God for these brave men and women and all the freedoms we have. May God bless our servicemen and woman, our veterans, and our families and friends. Happy Thanksgiving!

Please join me in holding all of our troops in prayer.

Almighty God, We ask your blessing upon our deployed troops, those on land, at sea and in the air in Iraq, Afghanistan and around the world. Hold our Marines, Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen, and Coast Guardsmen in the palm of your hand as they enter Harm’s Way. Protect them as they protect us in defense of liberty and the increase of freedom. Bless them and their families for the sacrifices and selfless acts they perform. Remind us all that courage is not the absence of fear, but the strength to do the right thing in the face of fear. Be with us also here at home as we pray for their safe return and peace in our time. Amen.

-Chaplain (CAPT) Jane Vieira, USN

Click here to enter free giveaways of eBook copies of Love You More Than You Know Mothers’ Stories About Sending Their Sons and Daughters to War in honor of our Veterans and their families (November 11-25).

When You Need a Helping Hand

Make The Connection, dedicated to sharing experiences and support for Veterans, offers a self assessment tool screening for depression, post traumatic stress, alcohol use, and substance abuse.This tool will indicate if it’s a good idea to see a professional. No information is collected, stored or sent over the Internet.  When you need a helping hand, make the connection .

Do You Know The Warning Signs of This Deadly Disease?

Our guest post today contains an urgent message. Please give a warm welcome to Doug Karr, a former Petty Officer, Second Class for the United States Navy. Doug currently writes about veteran health for the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance.

Mesothelioma is a deadly form of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos.  The early warning signs are subtle and often ignored. A majority of suffers have symptoms present for 2 to 3 months prior to diagnoses. These symptoms are over looked because they can be mistaken for common every day ailments.

Symptoms include shortness of breath, back or chest pain, difficulty swallowing, coughing, fever, weight loss, fatigue, muscle weakness, and hoarseness.  The latency period of this disease is what makes it so unique. A person may not experience symptoms from mesothelioma for 10 to even 40 years after their asbestos exposure.  So if you have ever been exposed to asbestos fibers at home or in the work place you should schedule regular doctors visits to watch for these symptoms.

Asbestos exposure is a possibility for veterans in all branches of the military: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard. However, Navy veterans are most at risk for health problems because the Navy used asbestos everywhere: shipyards, boiler rooms, engine rooms, galleys, mess halls, sleeping quarters and other facilities. For many Navy personnel, asbestos exposure was unavoidable.

All veterans of the armed forces may have been exposed to asbestos if they worked in certain occupations. Health problems and disability are very real possibilities for those who worked in mining, milling, insulation, construction, demolition, flooring, roofing, vehicle repair, manufacturing and other jobs that used asbestos products.

Asbestosis, pleural plaques, lung cancer and mesothelioma are some of the health problems associated with asbestos exposure. Veterans who struggle with these conditions find it difficult to work because of painful coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, abdominal pain and respiratory problems.

The United States Department of Veteran Affairs recognizes mesothelioma and other asbestos diseases as service-related disabilities. Former members of the armed forces may be eligible for health and disability benefits if their health problems were caused by asbestos exposure during their service years. In some cases, their dependents may also qualify for government benefits.

Thank you Doug for your service and for bringing us this important message.  Doug has graciously offered to answer any questions you may have. You can contact Doug at doug.karr.usn@gmail.com